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The trauma continuum: Experinces from injured persons and critical care nurses
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Nursing Care.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5367-1751
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2019.
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73253ISBN: 978-91-7790-336-9 (print)ISBN: 978-91-7790-337-6 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-73253DiVA, id: diva2:1297242
Public defence
2019-05-24, E632, Luleå, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Experiences of suffering multiple trauma: A qualitative study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of suffering multiple trauma: A qualitative study
2019 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 54, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

In an effort to strengthen health care professionals’ ability to anticipate and address multiple trauma patients’ needs, this study aims to explore the experience of suffering from multiple trauma.

Design

This is a qualitative descriptive study. Nine interviews were analysed using content analysis.

Setting

The study included patients who had been registered in the Swedish Intensive Care registry [SIR] due to suffering multiple trauma.

Findings

The analysis revealed one theme, A detour in life, based on three sub-themes: (a) Feeling lost and not knowing what to expect, (b) Striving to get life back on track and (c) Dealing with ‘dead ends’ during rehabilitation. The theme showed that those who suffered multiple trauma did not know what to expect of their recovery and they expressed experiencing a lack of understanding and guidance from healthcare professionals. As it was important to focus on the present and find ways to move on in life, they sought for other ways to find direction in matters of rehabilitation and care.

Conclusions

A shared understanding is essential in order to define a person’s needs. By setting short-term goals and improving documentation, healthcare professionals across the trauma recovery continuum could more easily gain insight of their patients’ needs and address them with supportive guidance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Life change events, Multiple trauma, Patient care planning, Qualitative research, Recovery, Wounds and Injuries
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73259 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2019.07.006 (DOI)000483965500001 ()31351691 (PubMedID)
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 2;2019-09-24 (johcin)

Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
2. The helicopter as a caring context: Experiences of people suffering trauma
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The helicopter as a caring context: Experiences of people suffering trauma
2017 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

When emergency medical services (EMS) are needed, the choice of transport depends on several factors. These may include the patient’s medical condition, transport accessibility to the accident site and the receiving hospital’s resources. Emergency care research is advancing, but little is known about the patient’s perspective of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS).

Aim

The aim of this study was to describe trauma patients’ experiences of HEMS.

Method

Thirteen persons (ages 21–76) were interviewed using an interview guide. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The analysis resulted in three themes: Being distraught and dazed by the event – patients experienced shock and tension, as well as feelings of curiosity and excitement. Being comforted by the caregivers – as the caregivers were present and attentive, they had no need for relatives in the helicopter. Being safe in a restricted environment – the participants’ injuries were taken seriously and the caregivers displayed effective teamwork.

Conclusion

For trauma patients to be taken seriously and treated as ‘worst cases’ enables them to trust their caregivers and ‘hand themselves over’ to their care. HEMS provide additional advantageous circumstances, such as being the sole patient and having proximity to a small, professional team.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-36828 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2016.09.006 (DOI)000402650700007 ()27697403 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85008600109 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-05-18  (andbra)

Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
3. Experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma: preparing for the unexpected: a qualitative study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma: preparing for the unexpected: a qualitative study
2016 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 36, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

SummarySettings and objectivesA midsize hospital in the north of Sweden with a high-tech intensive care unit and space for up to 10 patients, with an attached postoperative ward for up to 15 patients. The wards are manned by critical care nurses who are also responsible for carrying a trauma pager. When the alarm goes off, the critical care nurse leaves her/his duties and joins a trauma team. The aim of the study was to describe critical care nurse's experiences of nursing patients suffering from trauma.MethodA qualitative descriptive design was used. Data were collected through four focus group discussions with 15 critical care nurses analysed using qualitative content analysis.FindingsOne theme: Preparing for the unexpected with four subthemes: (1) Feeling competent, but sometimes inadequate; (2) Feeling unsatisfied with the care environment; (3) Feeling satisfied with well-functioning communication; and (4) Feeling a need to reflect when affected.ConclusionsNursing trauma patients require critical care nurses to be prepared for the unexpected. Two aspects of trauma care must be improved in order to fully address the challenges it poses: First, formal preparation and adequate resources must be invested to ensure delivery of quality trauma care. Secondly, follow-ups are needed to evaluate care measures and to give members of the trauma team the opportunity to address feelings of distress or concern.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4356 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2016.04.002 (DOI)000382343400009 ()27173952 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84965143712 (Scopus ID)24aa183b-dabb-474e-bb25-6c57b6430be0 (Local ID)24aa183b-dabb-474e-bb25-6c57b6430be0 (Archive number)24aa183b-dabb-474e-bb25-6c57b6430be0 (OAI)
Note

Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160404 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved
4. Patients’ health-related quality of life and perceptions of care: A longitudinal study based on data from the Swedish Trauma Registry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ health-related quality of life and perceptions of care: A longitudinal study based on data from the Swedish Trauma Registry
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73260 (URN)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-25

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Citation style
  • apa
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Output format
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