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Machinability of stone-plastic materials during diamond planing
College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7091-6696
College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University.
College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University.
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2019 (English)In: Applied Sciences: APPS, ISSN 1454-5101, E-ISSN 1454-5101, Vol. 9, no 7, article id 1373Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigated the machinability of a stone–plastic composite (SPC) via orthogonal cutting with diamond cutters. The objective was to determine the effect of cutting depth on its machinability, including cutting forces, heat, chip formation, and cutting quality. Increased cutting depth promoted an increase in both frictional and normal forces, and also had a strong influence on the change in normal force. The cutting temperatures of chips and tool edges showed an increasing trend as cutting depth increased. However, the cutting heat was primarily absorbed by chips, with the balance accumulating in the cutting edge. During chip formation, the highest von Mises strain was mainly found in SPC ahead of the cutting edge, and the SPC to be removed partially passed its elastic limit, eventually forming chips with different shapes. Furthermore, the average surface roughness and the mean peak-to-valley height of machined surfaces all positively correlated to an increase in cutting depth. Finally, with an increase in cutting depth, the chip shape changed from tubular, to ribbon, to arc, to segmental, and finally, to helical chips. This evolution in chip shape reduced the fluctuation in cutting force, improving cutting stability and cutting quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI, 2019. Vol. 9, no 7, article id 1373
Keywords [en]
composite material, polycrystalline diamond cutter, orthogonal cutting, digital image correlation, DIC analysis, full-field mechanics, machining properties
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Wood Science and Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-73369DOI: 10.3390/app9071373ISI: 000466547500108Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85064089350OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-73369DiVA, id: diva2:1301182
Note

Validerad;2019;Nivå 1;2019-04-09 (inah)

Available from: 2019-04-01 Created: 2019-04-01 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved

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Buck, DietrichEkevad, Mats

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