2122232425262724 of 68
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Thermomechanical Design and Analysis of the Lisa Phase Measurement System
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Gravitational Waves (GWs) are ripples in the curvature of spacetime that propagate as waves at the speed of light while travelling basically undisturbed from the moment of their creation by accelerated masses. GWs provide unique information about astrophysical sources, such as binary systems, allowing their exploration under a wide range of masses, mass ratios and physical states inaccessible otherwise and therefore opening a new window to observe the universe. The Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA) mission will be a spaceborne gravitational wave observatory that is expected to be launched in 2034. The observatory will operate a near-equilateral triangle constellation of three spacecraft in formation flying around the Sun with Earth-like orbits. The observatory will establish, for the first time, a huge laser interferometer of three arms separated by 2.5 million km at pm/ p H z sensitivity, allowing detection of GW signals in the low-frequencies (mHz) regime. Using technology proven by LISA Pathfinder and GRACE-Follow on mission, the LISA metrology system will continuously operate heterodyne laser interferometers in order to measure the stretching and squeezing of space-time coupled onto their laser links as pm-level pathlength displacements and recorded as tiny µ-cycle phase fluctuations over thousands of seconds by an on-board instrument so-called Phase Measurement System (PMS) or shortly "Phasemeter”. This master thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical design of an engineering model, currently under early phases of development, for the PMS instrument onboard the LISA S/C. The mechanical enclosure has been designed following a modular approach. Each PCB will be assembled into an individual enclosure, so future upgrades in the design without affecting the entire architecture. The thermal analysis conducted so far has concluded with the feasibility of a passive thermal management system in vacuum environments, based on heat conductivity throughout the mechanical enclosure towards the instrument baseplate. In particular, the following instrument features have been included within the analysis: 1. analog signal conditioning electronics, 2. analog-to-digital conversion, and 3. FPGA core signal processing, 4. high-phase fidelity frequency synthesis and 5. frequency distribution chain, i.e., all features with the most stringent thermal requirements of the PMS-EM architecture. Although the high-power consumption demands of the instrument, the proposed thermo-mechanical design showed a suitable implementation for reliable operation of components, below maximal specified temperature ranges, allowing safe operation of the electronics over mission lifetime. As the proposed design relies only on passive conductive heat transfer methods, it is implicit a reduction of instrument complexity, avoiding complex thermal approaches based on heat pipes distributions or active control systems. Moreover, the modular approach and thermal management system enhances the integration with adjacent modules and reduce cost when assembly the instrument within the payload. In this master thesis, it has been also designed and manufactured several mechanical enclosures, together with an active thermal management system, for preliminary prototyping of analog signal acquisition electronics. These prototypes have been tested in air, setting the thermal stability requirement at the thermal reference point (TRP). Test results have verified a thermal stability requirement below 0.1 K/Hz in order to accomplish with the stringent µ-cycle phase noise performance in the mHz frequency band. Further work will test those prototypes in Vacuum conditions, consolidating thermal modelling and noise coupling as initial precursors of the PMS-EM thermally critical module developments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. , p. 39
Keywords [en]
LISA, PCB, temperature, passive, aluminum, aluminium
National Category
Engineering and Technology Aerospace Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-76509OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-76509DiVA, id: diva2:1365810
External cooperation
AEI - Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics
Subject / course
Student thesis, at least 30 credits
Educational program
Space Engineering, master's level (120 credits)
Examiners
Available from: 2019-10-28 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(14753 kB)22 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 14753 kBChecksum SHA-512
44ad4b675a817f96015e5cad3fa6258fd26dd6abb8ecf4788b11ad831ce197005d2fc50a1bd2a195f83bc220bebef6bf0a942422234721c429a8fc413d8c9293
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering
Engineering and TechnologyAerospace Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 22 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 33 hits
2122232425262724 of 68
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf