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Perceived impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in winter settlements
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health, Medicine and Rehabilitation.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3619-2297
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6957-0568
2020 (English)In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 631-642Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to assess the impact of meteorological conditions on the use of public space in Scandinavia and Canada. Between September 21 and December 18, 2017, a cross-sectional online survey ‘EAMQ-Climate: space’ was distributed via web-based platforms. Survey responses were received from 361 residents (258 people from Scandinavia and 103 from Canada). The relative impact of the meteorological determinants on the use of public space was calculated, and a factor analysis was performed. Disparities between Canada and Scandinavia as well as between the climate zones represented were analysed using ANOVA. Overall results showed that the most significant meteorological enablers for the use of outdoor public spaces in winter were solar gain, snowfall and snow-covered surfaces. The main barriers were slush-covered and icy surfaces, rainfall and darkness. Wind and cold were conditions with less influence. The impact of rain and ice, however, differed between climatic zones. It was also established that, when addressing the meteorological impact on avoiding the use of public spaces in winter, it is vital to discriminate between conditions related to a) the ground surface and b) ambient conditions, as well as the particular significance of c) snow and sun, and d) darkness. For the design of public space in winter cities, we conclude that designers need to focus on a wider range of weather conditions than sun, wind and cold, and include snow, rainfall, slushy and icy ground and poor visibility. The study suggests that winter public space has a higher climatic design requirement to be successful than streets and pathways that are mainly used for soft mobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020. Vol. 64, no 4, p. 631-642
Keywords [en]
Public space, Urban microclimate, Winter cities, Outdoor activity
National Category
Architectural Engineering Physiotherapy
Research subject
Architecture; Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-77253DOI: 10.1007/s00484-019-01852-5PubMedID: 31907653Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85077613414OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-77253DiVA, id: diva2:1381664
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-03-30 (alebob)

Available from: 2019-12-26 Created: 2019-12-26 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved

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Larsson, AgnetaChapman, David

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