Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Comparison of Expressive Spoken Language Skills in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children With Typical Hearing
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Humans and technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7360-4858
Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11, article id 1405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When children start formal education, they are expected to be able to express complex thoughts. However, in order to do so, they need to be able to use both complex grammatical structures and a variety of words. One group that is at risk of having a delay in terms of their expressive language ability is children with cochlear implants (CI). In this study, we evaluated whether children with CI perform comparably to children with typical hearing (TH) on a standard expressive spoken grammar and a standard expressive spoken vocabulary task when the groups were matched on non-verbal intelligence and working memory capacity. It was found that the children with CI in this study performed more poorly on a standard expressive spoken vocabulary task but not on a standard expressive spoken grammar task when compared to the children with TH. Differences in terms of expressive spoken vocabulary do not seem to be explained by differences in cognitive ability. In addition, the variation in terms of expressive spoken language ability was larger in the children with CI compared to the children with TH. This might be explained by additional confounding factors, like the time of language deprivation or by a greater influence of cognitive differences for the acquisition of spoken language for children with CI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020. Vol. 11, article id 1405
Keywords [en]
expressive grammar, expressive vocabulary, working memory, non-verbal intelligence, cochlear implant, children
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-80608DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01405ISI: 000560121800001PubMedID: 32765338Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85088795747OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-80608DiVA, id: diva2:1462517
Note

Validerad;2020;Nivå 2;2020-08-31 (alebob)

Available from: 2020-08-31 Created: 2020-08-31 Last updated: 2022-04-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Wass, Malin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wass, Malin
By organisation
Humans and technology
In the same journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 67 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf