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Material ejection attempts during laser keyhole welding
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8298-292x
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3569-6795
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4265-1541
2021 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1526-6125, Vol. 67, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Material loss during keyhole mode laser welding often leads to surface imperfections that can negatively impact component performance. High-speed imaging identified four types of material ejection attempts: classical spatter, re-captured spatter, protuberances, and scalloping. The momentum attributed to the melt body, which is influenced by the keyhole properties, dictates whether the ejection attempt is successful or if the material is re-captured. The relationship between the dynamics of the keyhole and melt pool was elaborated in an extended systematic description of melt ejection attempts, which were then classified. Ejection attempts were often observed to be proceeded by a co-current swelling of the melt, adjacent to the keyhole, followed by a melt depression. The melt swell would elongate into a melt column with a concentration of momentum, where excessive momentum causes the melt to neck and separate into spatter. Trajectory determines if the spatter becomes a permanent fixture or re-incorporates into the melt body, with the latter having the possibility to cause further melt body disturbances leading to more ejection attempts. If the melt column fails to neck and separate, or an additional force acts upon the column, a protuberance or a scallop could then form. Keyhole and melt pool fluctuations were sometimes observed to be accommodated, avoiding material ejection. In these cases, a stable weld could be obtained with large variations in the dimensions of the melt pool and the keyhole.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021. Vol. 67, p. 91-100
Keywords [en]
spatter, protuberance, material ejection, keyhole stability, melt pool dynamics, laser welding
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-83449DOI: 10.1016/j.jmapro.2021.04.052ISI: 000658516300001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85104925644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-83449DiVA, id: diva2:1540766
Funder
Vinnova, 2019-00781
Note

Validerad;2021;Nivå 2;2021-05-06 (alebob)

Available from: 2021-03-30 Created: 2021-03-30 Last updated: 2021-06-17Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Laser welding and laser heat treatment of high strength steels
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laser welding and laser heat treatment of high strength steels
2021 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Laser-svetsning och värmebehandling av höghållfast stål
Abstract [en]

Laser materials processing, including thermal treatment and laser welding has been undergoing continuous growth in the manufacturing industry for decades. A laser beam offers high precision and energy transfer, capable of various processing. For many cases a Gaussian beam is applied, but lately development of more complex beam shapes has been developed, where e.g. multiple beams (beam splitting) can be used for increased tolerances during welding.

This thesis presents six papers (Papers A-F) on welding of high strength steels, laser pulse shaping, thermal treatments, and microstructural investigations. Different methods for obtaining a desirable weld were investigated through tailoring of the laser beam process. This affected the resulting temperature fields and thermal histories of the specimens. Experimental analysis was supported through various in-situ observation techniques and metallurgical studies.

Papers A-C present thermal processing and chemical manipulation to obtain the desired microstructure, by introducing and applying the here introduced Snapshot method. Paper A explores tailoring a laser pulse to mimic a hybrid welding process, Paper B elaborates the simulation to a multi-cycle process, and Paper C explores dilution. The manuscripts utilize a specialized experimental setup, optical analysis methods, and standard thermal measuring techniques. Metallographic analysis showed that thermal process optimization and/or dilution rate control during welding improved weld zone characteristics.

Improvements also include joint macrostructure characteristics, which are impacted by process stability, the theme of Papers D-F. Melt pool phenomena are studied in depth in Papers D and E. Paper D explores material ejections in a single beam welding scenario. Paper E investigates six beam shapes, from a single beam to a quad-beam arrangement. Paper F studies hybrid welding, a process that was simulated in Papers A-C but focused on the stability of the process instead of thermally guiding the microstructure. 

The studies complement each other in knowledge and methods. Welding of high strength steel is joining method-dependent, which imposes a unique thermal profile that affects the microstructures. The microstructure is also influenced by the chemical composition, an important point when multiple materials are used. The studies contribute an analysis of certain aspects of thermal and chemical effects of different laser-based processes to further optimize processing of specifically high strength steels, though the aspects can be generalized to other metals

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå University of Technology, 2021
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
Keywords
Laser welding, heat treatment, high strength steel, Snapshot method, microstructure
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-84181 (URN)978-91-7790-848-7 (ISBN)978-91-7790-849-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2021-09-09, E632, Luleå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2021-05-11 Created: 2021-05-07 Last updated: 2022-01-17Bibliographically approved

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Robertson, Stephanie M.Kaplan, Alexander F.H.Frostevarg, Jan

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