Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Deriving a Benefit Transfer Function for Threatened and Endangered Species in Interaction with Their Level of Charisma
Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7070, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3581-4704
Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7070, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Box 7070, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: Environments, E-ISSN 2076-3298, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biodiversity and species conservation are among the most urgent global issues. Both are under serious threat because of human intrusion and as a result, it is likely that present and future projects will affect threatened and endangered species. Thus, it is important to account for these impacts when evaluating and conducting cost and benefit analyses of projects. Due to their public good character and non-tradability, the total economic value of threatened and endangered species cannot be reflected by a market price and therefore, alternative approaches (stated preference method) are needed to determine their monetary value. This paper reviews and compares the valuation literature on threatened and endangered animals and conducts a meta-analysis regression to identify explanatory variables for the variation in willingness to pay for threatened and endangered species. The main findings of the meta-analysis show that the interaction of the level of threat and charisma have a positive effect on willingness to pay. Furthermore, developed countries have a higher willingness to pay compared to developing countries. Similarly, visitors of conservation sites have higher willingness to pay than residents. The provided example of a benefit transfer of the estimated function shows the practicability of our results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018. Vol. 5, no 2, article id 31
Keywords [en]
threatened and endangered species, literature review, meta-analysis, willingness to pay, choice experiment, contingent valuation method
National Category
Ecology Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-88378DOI: 10.3390/environments5020031ISI: 000427517500013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85057833130OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-88378DiVA, id: diva2:1619640
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2023-02-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records

Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
In the same journal
Environments
EcologyEconomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 23 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf