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Electrification of gasification-based biomass-to-X processes - a critical review and in-depth assessment
Technical University of Munich, Chair of Energy Systems, Boltzmannstr. 15 85748 Garching b. München Germany.
Technical University of Munich, Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability, Professorship of Regenerative Energy Systems, Schulgasse 16 Straubing 93415 Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8424-6918
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science. Technical University of Munich, Chair of Energy Systems, Boltzmannstr. 15 85748 Garching b. München Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6081-5736
Technical University of Munich, Campus Straubing for Biotechnology and Sustainability, Professorship of Regenerative Energy Systems, Schulgasse 16 Straubing 93415 Germany.
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2024 (English)In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 925-973Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To address the impacts of climate change, it is imperative to significantly decrease anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass-based chemicals and fuels will play a crucial role in substituting fossil-based feedstocks and reducing emissions. Gasification-based biomass conversion processes with catalytic synthesis producing chemicals and fuels (Biomass-to-X, BtX) are an innovative and well-proven process route. Since biomass is a scarce resource, its efficient utilization by maximizing product yield is key. In this review, the electrification of BtX processes is presented and discussed as a technological option to enhance chemical and fuel production from biomass. Electrified processes show many advantages compared to BtX and electricity-based processes (Power-to-X, PtX). Electrification options are classified into direct and indirect processes. While indirect electrification comprises mostly the addition of H2 from water electrolysis (Power-and-Biomass-to-X, PBtX), direct electrification refers to power integration into specific processing steps by converting electricity into the required form of energy such as heat, electrochemical energy or plasma used (eBtX). After the in-depth review of state-of-the-art technologies, all technologies are discussed in terms of process performance, maturity, feasibility, plant location, land requirement, and dynamic operation. H2 addition in PBtX processes has been widely investigated in the literature with process simulations showing significantly increased carbon efficiency and product yield. Similar studies on direct electrification (eBtX) are limited in the literature due to low technological maturity. Further research is required on both, equipment level technology development, as well as process and system level, to compare process options and evaluate performance, economics, environmental impact and future legislation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry , 2024. Vol. 17, no 3, p. 925-973
National Category
Energy Systems Chemical Process Engineering Energy Engineering
Research subject
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-103854DOI: 10.1039/d3ee02876cScopus ID: 2-s2.0-85181966035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-103854DiVA, id: diva2:1831452
Note

Validerad;2024;Nivå 2;2024-03-26 (hanlid);

Funder: German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Action (03EE5044B); German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (01DD21005);

Full text license: CC BY-NC 3.0

Available from: 2024-01-25 Created: 2024-01-25 Last updated: 2024-03-26Bibliographically approved

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Umeki, Kentaro

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