Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Liquid water flow in Pinus radiata during drying
University of Stellenbosch.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
University of Stellenbosch.
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 275-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

End-sealed 60×60×250 mm3 Pinus radiata pieces were dried at 65/37 °C (dry bulb/wet bulb temperature) and 4 ms-1 air speed to study various drying phenomena above fibre saturation point. While drying, an X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner captured a cross-cut density image every ten minutes. The density data was used to determine moisture content, rate of moisture loss from the core, wetline (boundary line of the free water region) depth and cross-cut area of the wood pieces. Repeating patterns were observed, which indicated that the cavity-size distribution of the wood pieces dictated fluctuations in the rate of moisture loss from the core and cross-cut area shrinkage during drying in the free water phase. It is hypothesised that, while drying an interconnected capillary network in the free water phase, the largest meniscus penetrates a wood piece through the largest cavities, thus also allowing air into the capillary network. The largest meniscus would always get smaller as it penetrates the wood piece until it is not the largest meniscus in the network anymore. Then the new largest meniscus would start penetrating the capillary network, etc. The largest meniscus would also determine the liquid tension in the capillary network. When the largest meniscus gets small enough, and the liquid tension strong enough, deformation and collapse of the remaining liquid-filled cavities can occur. A large liquid-filled interconnected capillary network would eventually fragment into a number of smaller liquid-filled interconnected networks, at which point a receding wetline could be observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 65, no 4, p. 275-283
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-4366DOI: 10.1007/s00107-007-0171-yISI: 000248328000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34547153129Local ID: 24e9c0d0-7017-11dc-a60c-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-4366DiVA, id: diva2:977231
Note
Validerad; 2007; 20071001 (bajo)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Morén, Tom

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Morén, Tom
By organisation
Wood Science and Engineering
In the same journal
European Journal of Wood and Wood Products
Bio Materials

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 50 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf