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Physical capacity in physically active and non-active adolescents
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
Luleå tekniska universitet.
Department of Orthopaedics, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9813-2719
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1741-3842, E-ISSN 1741-3850, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate differences in physical capacity between physically active and non-active men and women among graduates from upper secondary school. Subject and methods: Research participants were graduates (38 women and 61 men) from upper secondary school. Physical activity was determined using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and participants were dichotomously characterized as being physically active or physically non-active according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Aerobic capacity was measured using the Åstrand cycle ergometer test. Participants also underwent tests of muscular strength and balance. Results: Maximum oxygen uptake differed significantly between physically active and non-active men (mean ± SD 3.6 ± 0.7 vs 3.0 ± 0.6 l/kg, p = 0.002) and women (3.0 ± 0.6 vs 2.5 ± 0.3 l/kg, p = 0.016). There was a difference among physically active and non-active men regarding push-ups (37.1 ± 9.0 vs 28.5 ± 7.0, p < 0.001) and sit-ups (59.2 ± 30.2 vs 39.6 ± 19.4, p = 0.010). No significant differences were found regarding vertical jump or grip strength among men, any of the muscle strength measurements among women, and balance (in any sex). Conclusion: Activity levels had impact on aerobic capacity in both sexes, but did not seem to have the same impact on muscular strength and balance, especially in women

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 19, no 2, p. 131-138
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-7938DOI: 10.1007/s10389-010-0371-5Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79958003779Local ID: 6608f390-ddc6-11df-8b36-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-7938DiVA, id: diva2:980828
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20101022 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Mikaelsson, KatarinaNyberg, LarsMichaelson, Peter

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