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Women's movements: abeyant or still on the move?
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2350-2623
Luleå tekniska universitet.
2007 (English)In: Equal Opportunities International, ISSN 0261-0159, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 352-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper seeks to offer a consideration of the adequacy of the concept of abeyance in accounting for women's movement processes in non-social movement organisations in periods characterised by quiescence rather than insurgence. Design/methodology/approach - The article is primarily conceptual. Findings - By extending the political process school of social movement theory, which relies heavily on visible activism to explain movement success, to include the new social movement approach, it is contended that underlying processes of change, associated with the values and affiliations of those involved in non-social movement organisations, become clearer. Less visible processes are identified through the variable rhythms and multiple, discontinuous experiences of women's movement supporters characterised as concealed adherents, informal networkers, and fellow travellers who can include male supporters. Research limitations/implications - Limitations: as the paper is primarily conceptual, there is a need to develop the practical implications beyond those mentioned below. Implications: there is a need to reorient research into organisational change to take fuller account of social movement processes. Practical implications - It is recognised that the literature on organisational and managerial change in non-social movement organisations needs to take account of the differing experiences and potential strategies of those likely to be affected. Originality/value - Originality of the paper lies in the use of insights drawn from the field of political sociology to enrich understanding of gender and organisational change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 26, no 4, p. 352-369
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Gender and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8387DOI: 10.1108/02610150710749449Local ID: 6e490af0-6c26-11dc-89fb-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8387DiVA, id: diva2:981279
Note
Validerad; 2007; 20070926 (biem)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved

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Barry, JimBerg, Elisabeth

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