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Potential conflicts between environmental legislation and conservation exemplified by aquatic macrophytes
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4208-345X
Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), University of Oulu.
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Trondheim.
Research Centre for European Environmental Law, Faculty of Law, University of Bremen.
2010 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 656, no 1, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is important that legislation on water quality issues of freshwaters is not in conflict with nature conservation purposes. So far, it is however unknown how the assessment of ecological status according to for example the Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Community relates to the status of lakes according to the Habitat Directive (HD) or to national environmental objectives including, e.g., the protection of important wetland areas and red-listed species. We used lake macrophyte classification schemes of Norway, Sweden, and Finland and a total of 1,014 lakes to evaluate the possible conflict between these directives and national legislation. The classification schemes represent mainly trophic indices penalizing lakes with elevated phosphorous concentrations. In general, high ecological status according to the WFD did not mean high number of red-listed species or high status according to the HD or other national environmental objectives. In Sweden 78%, in Norway 47%, and in Finland 29% of lakes with red-listed species were classified as lakes of moderate or worse ecological status based on the macrophyte classification scheme. These lakes thus did not fulfill the demands of the WFD. Restoration of surface water toward fulfilling the demands requires in practice a reduction of the trophic status. This might potentially result in for example the loss of red-listed species. To avoid such potential conflicts, we primarily suggest revising the national quality assessment systems toward implicitly incorporating nature conservation aspects, e.g., the number of red-listed species in a multi-metric assessment system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 656, no 1, p. 107-115
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Landscape Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-8891DOI: 10.1007/s10750-010-0424-3ISI: 000282180300011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77957133361Local ID: 77149ca0-c261-11df-a707-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-8891DiVA, id: diva2:981829
Note
Validerad; 2010; 20100917 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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