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Rolling stock condition monitoring using wheel/rail forces
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
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2012 (English)In: Insight (Northampton), ISSN 1354-2575, E-ISSN 1754-4904, Vol. 54, no 8, p. 451-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Railway vehicles are efficient because of the low resistance in the contact zone between wheel and rail. In order to remain efficient, train operators and infrastructure owners need to keep rails, wheels and vehicles in an acceptable condition. Wheel wear affects the dynamic characteristics of vehicles and the dynamic force impact on the rail. The shape of the wheel profile affects the performance of railway vehicles in different ways. Wheel condition has historically been managed by identifying and removing wheels from service when they exceed an impact threshold. Condition monitoring of railway vehicles is mainly performed using wheel impact load detectors and truck performance detectors. These systems use either forces or stress on the rail to interpret the condition. This paper will show measurements taken at the research station outside Luleå in northern Sweden. The station measures the wheel/rail forces, both lateral and vertical, at the point of contact in a curve with a 484 m radius at speeds of up to 100 km/h. Data are analysed to show differences for various wheel positions and to determine the robustness of the system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 54, no 8, p. 451-455
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Operation and Maintenance; Mining and Rock Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9295DOI: 10.1784/insi.2012.54.8.451ISI: 000308388900007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84865592618Local ID: 7e2ae51d-f48a-4b72-bed2-69448d1ad450OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9295DiVA, id: diva2:982233
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120913 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Palo, MikaelSchunnesson, HåkanKumar, UdayLarsson-Kråik, Per-OlofGalar, Diego

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