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Playing ice hockey and basketball increases serum levels of S-100B in elite players: a pilot study
Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Medical Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3628-0705
Umeå University, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
2003 (English)In: Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1050-642X, E-ISSN 1536-3724, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 292-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in serum concentrations of the biochemical markers of brain damage S-100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in ice hockey and basketball players during games. DESIGN: Descriptive clinical research. SETTING: Competitive games of the Swedish Elite Ice Hockey League and the Swedish Elite Basketball League. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-six male ice hockey players (from two teams) and 18 basketball players (from two teams). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: S-100B and NSE were analyzed using two-site immunoluminometric assays. The numbers of acceleration/deceleration events were assessed from videotape recordings of the games. Head trauma-related symptoms were monitored 24 hours after the game using the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire. RESULTS: Changes in serum concentrations of S-100B (postgame - pregame values) were statistically significant after both games (ice hockey, 0.072 +/- 0.108 microg/L, P = 0.00004; basketball, 0.076 +/- 0.091 microg/L, P = 0.001). In basketball, there was a significant correlation between the change in S-100B (postgame-pregame values) and jumps, which were the most frequent acceleration/deceleration (r = 0.706, P = 0.002). For NSE, no statistically significant change in serum concentration was found in either game. For one ice hockey player who experienced concussion during play, S-100B was increased more than for the other players. CONCLUSIONS: S-100B was released into the blood of the players as a consequence of game-related activities and events. Analysis of the biochemical brain damage markers (in particular S-100B) seems to have the potential to become a valuable additional tool for assessment of the degree of brain tissue damage in sport-related head trauma and probably for decision making about returning to play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 13, no 5, p. 292-302
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-9976Local ID: 8b6bd450-c33e-11db-9ea3-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-9976DiVA, id: diva2:982915
Note
Validerad; 2003; 20070223 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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