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Managing short-term efficiency and long-term development through industrialized construction
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1746-2637
Department of Construction Management, Lund University.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
Department of Construction Management, Lund University.
2014 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 97-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a strong need for a productive and innovative infrastructure sector because of its monetary value and importance for the development of a sustainable society. An increased level of industrialization is often proposed as a way to improve efficiency and productivity in construction projects. In prior literature on industrialized construction, there are however neither many studies addressing more long-term aspects of innovation and sustainability nor studies within the infrastructure context. Organizational theory suggests that firms need to be ambidextrous and focus on both long-term exploration of new knowledge and technologies and short-term exploitation of current knowledge and technologies, in order to achieve sustainable development. Therefore, an investigation of how both short-term exploitative performance objectives and long-term explorative development can be addressed when implementing industrialized construction in infrastructure projects was conducted. A case study consisting of four infrastructure projects shows that the main drivers for increased industrialization are of an exploitative nature, focusing on cost savings and increased productivity through more efficient processes. The main barriers to increased industrialization are however related to both explorative and exploitative activities. Hence, by managing the identified barriers and explicitly addressing both exploitation and exploration, industrialized construction can improve both short-term efficiency and long-term innovation and sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 97-108
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified Construction Management
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation; Construction Engineering and Management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10467DOI: 10.1080/01446193.2013.814920Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84896542504Local ID: 9476e286-8a95-4990-8e21-25e94ecf6252OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10467DiVA, id: diva2:983412
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130816 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson, Per-ErikSzentes, Henrik

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