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Lignin in Ethylene Glycol and Poly(ethylene glycol): Fortified Lubricants with Internal Hydrogen Bonding
State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6085-7880
School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northeast Petroleum University, Daqing.
State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Intelligent Composites Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron.
2016 (English)In: A C S Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1840-1849Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignin, one of the most naturally abundant polymers, has been successfully incorporated into ethylene glycol (EG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in this work and fortified lubricating properties were achieved in EG/lignin and PEG/lignin. The molecular interaction between lignin and EG (or PEG) has been revealed as hydrogen bonding, which serves as the dominating factor that determines the thermal, rheological, and tribological properties of the mixed systems of EG/lignin and PEG/lignin. The physicochemical properties of the mixed lubricants are tightly related to the state of internal hydrogen bonding (EG–EG, PEG–PEG, EG–lignin, PEG–lignin, and lignin–lignin) and are well correlated to their lubrication properties. Generally, larger lignin fractions lead to better lubricating performance in both EG and PEG systems. Lignin liquefaction in PEG has been addressed by catalytic degradation with the presence of sulfuric acid, which was then neutralized by triethanolamine for lubricant development. Lignin in PEG significantly improves the lubricating property at higher pressure conditions, where a wear reduction of 94.6% was observed. Lignin fortified EG and PEG based lubricants show outstanding noncorrosive characteristic to the mostly used metal materials such as aluminum and iron.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1840-1849
National Category
Tribology (Interacting Surfaces including Friction, Lubrication and Wear)
Research subject
Machine Elements
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10748DOI: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b00049ISI: 000371755400143Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84960153463Local ID: 99a78091-8fb5-4bbf-a3fb-880ba6b23981OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10748DiVA, id: diva2:983695
Note
Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20160317 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Shi, Yijun

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