Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Flow-enhancing layers in the vacuum infusion process
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1033-0244
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Energy Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6958-5508
Swedish Institute of Composites, Piteå.
2002 (English)In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 895-901Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current trend towards increased use of vacuum infusion molding for large surface-area parts has increased the interest in an advanced modeling of the process. Because the driving pressure is limited to 1 atmosphere, it is essential to evaluate possible ways to accelerate the impregnation. One way of doing this is to use layers of higher permeability within the reinforcing stack, i.e. flow-enhancing layers. We present an experimental investigation of the flow front shape when using such layers. The through-thickness flow front was observed by making a number of color marks on the glass-mats forming the reinforcing stack, which became visible when the resin reached their position. The in-plane flow front was derived from observations of the uppermost layer. It turned out that existing analytical models agree very well with the experiments if effective permeability data is used, that is, permeability obtained from vacuum infusions. However, the fill-time was nearly twice as long as predicted from permeability data obtained in a stiff tool. This rather large discrepancy may be due to certain features of a flexible mold half and is therefore a topic for further research. The lead-lag to final thickness ratio is dependent on the position of the flow front and ranges form 5 to 10 for the cases tested. Interestingly the lead-lag has a miximum close to the inlet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 23, no 5, p. 895-901
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Energy Engineering
Research subject
Fluid Mechanics; Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11324DOI: 10.1002/pc.10486ISI: 000179047400018Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0036809204Local ID: a43c00c0-9fbe-11db-8975-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-11324DiVA, id: diva2:984274
Note
Validerad; 2002; 20061221 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Andersson, MagnusLundström, StaffanGebart, Rikard

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, MagnusLundström, StaffanGebart, Rikard
By organisation
Fluid and Experimental MechanicsEnergy Science
In the same journal
Polymer Composites
Fluid Mechanics and AcousticsEnergy Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 107 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf