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Mold growth on sapwood boards exposed outdoors: the impact of wood drying
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3544-8716
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7711-9267
SP Träteknik.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
2011 (English)In: Forest products journal, ISSN 0015-7473, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 170-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mold growth on dried Norway spruce and Scots pine sapwood boards was investigated in an accelerated outdoor field test for 96 days. The boards were dried using three different methods of stacking: single stacking, double stacking with the sapwood sides in each pair facing toward each other, and double stacking with sapwood sides facing outward. Drying was performed at three temperatures: 25ºC, corresponding to air drying, and kiln drying at 70ºC and 110ºC. The degree of mold growth was visually assessed on both sides of each board. On average, pine boards showed a higher level of mold growth than the spruce boards. The highest average level of mold growth was found on the boards kiln dried at 708C, whereas the air-dried boards and the boards kiln dried at 110ºC showed considerably less mold growth. Stacking the boards during drying had a large impact on mold susceptibility of the sapwood. This study confirmed that, during the drying process, it is possible to direct the migration of nutrients in sapwood toward one chosen side of each board by double stacking; the opposite side leaches out, which has a great impact on surface mold growth. Chemical analyses of monosaccharide sugar gradients beneath the boards’ surfaces confirmed the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 61, no 2, p. 170-179
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11449Local ID: a69a2d94-cf91-4334-8a5f-84899095e80eOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-11449DiVA, id: diva2:984399
Note
Validerad; 2011; 20110905 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Sehlstedt-Persson, MargotKarlsson, OlovMorén, Tom

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