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Identifying Process Dynamics through a Two-Level Factorial Experiment
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1473-3670
2014 (English)In: Quality Engineering, ISSN 0898-2112, E-ISSN 1532-4222, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 154-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Industrial experiments are often subjected to critical disturbances and in a small design with few runs the loss of experimental runs may dramatically reduce analysis power. This article considers a common situation in process industry where the observed responses are represented by time series. A time series analysis approach to analyze two-level factorial designs affected by disturbances is developed and illustrated by analyzing a blast furnace experiment. In particular, a method based on transfer function-noise modeling is compared with a ‘traditional’ analysis using averages of the response in each run as the single response in an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Abstract [en]

Dynamic processes undergo a transition time when changing experimental factors and therefore an experimenter is often interested in estimating effect dynamics alongside effect sizes. This article illustrates an eight-step analysis procedure for model identification of a multiple-input transfer function–noise model for the response from a two-level factorial experiment in a blast furnace process. Because real data often are affected by disturbances and missing observations, our proposed procedure deals with these problems and results in a transfer function–noise model that captures system dynamics and provides effect estimates from the experiment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 26, no 2, p. 154-167
National Category
Reliability and Maintenance
Research subject
Quality Technology and Management
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-11505DOI: 10.1080/08982112.2013.830738ISI: 000334045900002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84899029765Local ID: a7ef5a7e-a6a1-4b17-946c-d502bf8ef379OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-11505DiVA, id: diva2:984455
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20120810 (pedlun)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Lundkvist, PederVanhatalo, Erik

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  • apa
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