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The activation of CO2 by potassium-promoted Ru(001) I. FT-IRAS and TDMS study of oxalate and carbonate intermediates
1994 (English)In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 316, no 3, p. 277-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The interaction of CO2 with the clean and alkali promoted Ru(001) surface has been studied with time-evolved Fourier transform-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRAS) and thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS). CO2 adsorbs on the clean Ru(001) surface at 85 K in a physisorbed CO2 monolayer, which desorbs undissociated at 100 K. The interaction of CO2 with a √3 × √3-R30° monolayer of potassium on Ru(001) results in the facile formation of oxalate at 85 K. Oxalate decomposes to carbonate after heating above 150 K, i.e. C2O4 → CO3 + CO. Vibrational spectra suggest, in agreement with theoretical calculations, an ionic carbonate species with D3h symmetry and the molecular plane oriented perpendicular to the surface, although alternate coordinations cannot be completely ruled out. Decomposition of the carbonate starts at 700 K and results in the simultaneous desorption of K and CO2 as major decompositions products, suggesting a reaction pathway of CO3 → CO2 + O and a K:CO3 stoichiometry of ≈1:1. The interaction of CO2 with a multilayer of potassium adsorbed on Ru(001), exhibits similar intermediates as observed for the monolayer, i.e. oxalate and carbonate. However, the overall reaction behavior is more complex and controlled by the penetration of CO2 into the potassium layer, which limits the reaction to only a few (4-5) of the topmost potassium layers. Reaction at 85 K reveals the formation of oxalate, CO2-2 and possibly CO-2 species. Annealing of the multilayer to 425 K results in the formation of carbonate, and the desorption of unreacted potassium. Vibrational spectra characterize an essentially ionic carbonate species with a preferential orientation of the molecular plane perpendicular to the surface, although the vibrational linewidths suggest imperfect ordering of the layer. Further annealing to 550 K results in a well-ordered "bilayer", containing two carbonate species with the molecular plane perpendicular (C2v, first layer) and parallel (C3v, second layer) to the surface, respectively. Decomposition of this layer at 700 K leaves a carbonate monolayer which subsequently decomposes at 750 K. The overall decomposition behavior of the multilayer is complex and is sensitive to the preparation and thickness of the potassium multilayer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1994. Vol. 316, no 3, p. 277-293
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Fysik
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12066DOI: 10.1016/0039-6028(94)91220-3Local ID: b1d2d5a0-3870-11dd-8721-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-12066DiVA, id: diva2:985016
Note
Upprättat; 1994; 20080612 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Paul, Jan

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