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Mould susceptibility of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood: Impact of drying, thermal modification, and copper-based preservative
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3544-8716
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
2013 (English)In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 85, p. 284-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of mould on wood surfaces depends on several factors. Although mould does not affect the mechanical properties of wood, it greatly reduces the aesthetic value of wood like the sapwood of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), which is very prone to mould. In addition, adverse health effects of mould on humans are also a great concern. Different types of dried and treated wood were used to observe whether they had enhanced durability against mould following an accelerated laboratory test method in a climate chamber. Samples were green, air-dried, industrially thermally-modified, treated with copper-based preservative, and kiln-dried wood, which were tested within a single test run. The test produced the following main results: the thermal modification increased the durability of the wood, and the protective effectiveness of alternative treatments was comparable to that of commercially available copper-based treatment. However, the initial moisture content of the samples during mould exposure had a great influence on the onset of mould growth. The risk of mould susceptibility of industrial kiln-dried lumber can be reduced by drying using the double-layering technique which likely forced the nutrients to deposit near the evaporation surfaces followed by planing off the nutrient enriched edges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 85, p. 284-288
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12380DOI: 10.1016/j.ibiod.2013.06.031ISI: 000327166300039Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84884246330Local ID: b84bb295-5eee-4f48-babb-1a3ab3acb148OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-12380DiVA, id: diva2:985330
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20130607 (sheahm)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Ahmed, Sheikh AliSehlstedt-Persson, MargotMorén, Tom

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