Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A study of a plan-do-check-act method used in less industrialized activities: two cases from industrialized housebuilding
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2699-2533
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5907-7788
2014 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 109-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In construction projects, a large number of deviations are usually found during inspections and adjusted in a reactive manner. For projects to become proactive, root causes need to be identified and eliminated as a part of a process of continuous improvement (CI). Plan-do-check-act (PDCA) methods are part of CI and have been used with success within the manufacturing industry for decades. Research studies of PDCA in construction are less common, which could be explained by the past dominance of the project-based nature of construction compared to the process-based nature of manufacture. Industrialized construction, however, has changed this picture somewhat, and it is of interest to find out how well it works for less industrialized activities in construction. A PDCA method was tested in two cases selected from one medium-sized Swedish industrialized housebuilder, which uses a building system based on offsite manufactured modules. Empirical results are based on systematic data gathered through interviews and participant observations. Results from the two cases show that the PDCA method worked even when processes were divided into industrialized parts within a factory and non-industrial parts at the construction site although this might lead to temporary corrective actions rather than permanent process actions

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 32, no 1-2, p. 109-125
National Category
Construction Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Timber Structures
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-12872DOI: 10.1080/01446193.2013.812227Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84896521963Local ID: c04cd708-99f9-4cf0-8b2a-40bf3a68f860OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-12872DiVA, id: diva2:985823
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20130123 (marsan)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Meiling, JohnSandberg, MarcusJohnsson, Helena

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Meiling, JohnSandberg, MarcusJohnsson, Helena
By organisation
Structural and Construction Engineering
In the same journal
Construction Management and Economics
Construction ManagementBuilding Technologies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 536 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf