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Use and design of high strength steel structures
2002 (English)In: Revue de métallurgie (Imprimé), ISSN 0035-1563, E-ISSN 1156-3141, Vol. 99, no 23, p. 72-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High strength steel (HSS) is a concept that changes with time. The steel industry leads the development but the construction industry is conservative and slow in adopting the new grades. Hence, the volumes of HSS are small (but profitable for the steel maker). Hot rolled sections are today available in grades up to S460 as TM-steel. Plates of QT-steel are commercially available in grades up to S1100 although not yet standardized above S960. The price increase is less than the increase of the yield strength and it is therefore always economical to use HSS in structures where the strength can be fully utilized. Considering also the fabrication costs it is even more favourable to use HSS. Reduced cost is not the only reason for using HSS. in some applications the reduction of the weight is an important advantage because the payload can be increased. This is the case for vehicles and for mobile cranes and in these applications HSS is already widespread. An increasingly important concern is the environment and more specifically the use of energy and raw material. By using HSS less resources are spent for fulfilling a given function. Environmental concern is therefore a valid reason for using HSS. For each application and type of structural solution there is an upper limit for the strength that can be utilized. Other requirements, like deflection limitations or fatigue may govern or instability phenomena may reduce the advantage of HSS. The conclusion from this fact is that new structural forms and details have to be developed in order to increase this limit. Such development is rarely possible in connection with routine design so it has to be done in separate projects paid by industry or government funds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 99, no 23, p. 72-73
National Category
Building Technologies
Research subject
Steel Structures
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-13371Local ID: c97057e0-99a8-11db-8975-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-13371DiVA, id: diva2:986324
Note
Validerad; 2002; Bibliografisk uppgift: 23es Journees Siderurgiques Int. Suppl.; 20061230 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, Bernt

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