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Snow and frost: implications for spatiotemporal infiltration patterns - a review
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Process and Environmental Engineering, University of Oulu.
Bioforsk, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Ås.
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Process and Environmental Engineering, University of Oulu, University of Oulu, Bioforsk, UOULU.
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2016 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1230-1250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Vast regions of the northern hemisphere are exposed to snowfall and seasonal frost. This has large effects on spatiotemporal distribution of infiltration and groundwater recharge processes as well as on the fate of pollutants. Therefore, snow and frost need to be central inherent elements of risk assessment and management schemes. However, snow and frost are often neglected or treated summarily or in a simplistic way by groundwater modellers. Snow deposition is uneven, and the snow is likely to sublimate, be redistributed and partly melt during the winter influencing the mass and spatial distribution of snow storage available for infiltration, the presence of ice layers within and under the snowpack and, therefore, also the spatial distribution of depths and permeability of the soil frost. In steep terrain, snowmelt may travel downhill tens of metres in hours along snow layers. The permeability of frozen soil is mainly influenced by soil type, its water and organic matter content, and the timing of the first snow in relation to the timing of sub-zero temperatures. The aim with this paper is to review the literature on snow and frost processes, modelling approaches with the purpose to visualize and emphasize the need to include these processes when modelling, managing and predicting groundwater recharge for areas exposed to seasonal snow and frost

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 30, no 8, p. 1230-1250
National Category
Geochemistry
Research subject
Applied Geology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14137DOI: 10.1002/hyp.10703ISI: 000373959500006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84947976376Local ID: d795eba8-afbf-4237-8041-50a520326748OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-14137DiVA, id: diva2:987091
Note
Validerad; 2016; Nivå 2; 20151201 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Lundberg, Angela

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