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The influence of passion and work–life thoughts on work satisfaction
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0656-4419
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8770-8874
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design. University of Vaasa.
2013 (English)In: Human Resource Development Quarterly, ISSN 1044-8004, E-ISSN 1532-1096, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 469-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Dualistic Model of Passion has gained increasing attention in social psychology in the past decade. Besides defining passion as “a strong inclination or desire toward an activity that one likes, finds important, and in which one invests time and energy” (Vallerand et al., 2003, p. 757), it acknowledges two types of passion, harmonious and obsessive, which develop according to how individuals internalize an activity in their self-concept. A growing body of empirical research, particularly in nonwork settings, has demonstrated that harmonious passion and obsessive passion have distinct outcomes. As such, this two-dimensional passion construct may be particularly useful for developing a more comprehensive understanding of how individuals engage with work compared to the existing one-dimensional constructs of job engagement used in organizational literature. The present study develops hypotheses and tests the direct effect of harmonious and obsessive passion with work satisfaction. It also aims to develop theory by connecting the dualistic passion approach with work–life conflict; in doing so, it tests how individuals' off-task thoughts at work and on-task thoughts off work may mediate this relationship. Using a quantitative survey, the hypotheses are tested on a random sample of individuals engaged in business start-ups in Sweden. Whereas harmonious passion exhibits a direct effect with work satisfaction, obsessive passion exhibits an indirect effect through on-task thoughts off work with work satisfaction

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 24, no 4, p. 469-492
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14501DOI: 10.1002/hrdq.21172ISI: 000328220900004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84889646087Local ID: dde86657-a9cf-4007-9cbf-1372409a9a0cOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-14501DiVA, id: diva2:987474
Note
Validerad; 2013; 20131211 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Thorgren, SaraWincent, JoakimSirén, Charlotta

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