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A sub-process view of working memory capacity: evidence from effects of speech on prose memory
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7584-2275
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9181-2084
2010 (English)In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we outline a framework labelled the "sub-process view" for understanding correlations between working memory capacity (WMC) and other phenomena. This view suggests that "WMC = sub-process1 + sub-process2 + ... + sub-processn" and that any relationship between WMC and another construct is actually a relationship with a specific sub-process covered by the WMC construct. Furthermore, different sub-processes are functionally distinct and they can be measured by specific intrusion errors on WMC tasks. We show that a sub-process (measured by immediate/current-list intrusions) is related to the effects of speech on prose memory (semantic auditory distraction), whereas another sub-process (measured by delayed/prior-list intrusions) is not (Experiment 1 and 2). Furthermore, we developed a new WMC task ("size-comparison span") and found that the relationship between WMC (measured with "operation span") and semantic auditory distraction is actually a relationship between a sub-process (measured by current-list intrusions in our new task) and semantic auditory distraction (Experiment 2). In contrast, previous research has shown that delayed intrusions underlie the correlation between WMC and reading comprehension, whereas immediate intrusions are unrelated to reading comprehension. Taken together, we argue that WMC is related to semantic auditory distraction and reading comprehension for entirely different reasons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 18, no 3, p. 310-326
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14786DOI: 10.1080/09658211003601530ISI: 000277650200008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77951688758Local ID: e3578010-6ba2-11de-9f57-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-14786DiVA, id: diva2:987759
Note

Validerad; 2010; 20090708 (jeskor)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Sörqvist, PatrikKörning-Ljungberg, JessicaLjung, Robert

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