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Improving cellulose/polypropylene nanocomposites properties with chemical modified bagasse nanofibers and maleated polypropylene
National Research Centre.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8909-3554
National Research Centre.
National Research Centre.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The properties of cellulose/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites with n-octadecyl-modified bagasse nanofibers (MBNF) were compared to those with maleated polypropylene (MAPP) coupling agent. The nanocomposites were prepared by twin-screw extrusion with bagasse nanofiber (BNF) content varying from 2.5 to 10 wt%. The compression molded nanocomposites sheets were characterized regarding their tensile strength properties, dynamic mechanical thermal properties, crystallinity, water absorption, transparency and loss of strength due to composting in soil. As a compatibilizer to improve the tensile strength properties and transparency of PP/cellulose nanofibers nanocomposites, MAPP was more effective than n-octadecyl-modified cellulose nanofibers. The crystallinity of the nanocomposites was lower than that of neat PP except for those prepared using high loading of MBNF. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of the prepared materials showed that adding the different nanofibers (treated or untreated) resulted in better mechanical thermal properties above glass transition temperature (Tg) of PP. Water absorption capability in all nanocomposites was weakened while that in PP/MBNF was the lowest. No significant differences were found between the nanocomposites with different kinds of nanofibers regarding the loss of their tensile strength after compositing in soil up to six months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 33, no 1, p. 26-36
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15017DOI: 10.1177/0731684413509292ISI: 000328669800003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84891277951Local ID: e797ba20-08e6-4260-a9a2-429dcf93962cOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-15017DiVA, id: diva2:987990
Note
Validerad; 2014; 20131030 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Mathew, Aji P.Oksman, Kristiina

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