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Preparation of Nanocellulose from Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) via Chemical and Chemo-mechanical Processes
Biocomposite Technology Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM).
Biocomposite Technology Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM).
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia.
2015 (English)In: Handbook of Polymer Nanocomposites. Processing, Performance and Application: Polymer Nanocomposites of Cellulose Nanoparticles, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 119-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A fundamental understanding of the relationships between basic fiber properties, methods of processing, and composite end use performance properties has been well developed due to recent advances within the biocomposites research community. Simultaneously, advanced engineered biocomposites are currently being developed to meet the diverse needs of users for high-performance materials as well as economical commodity products. Advancements in nanotechnology have led to industrial isolation of nanocrystalline cellulose [1, 2]. While nanocrystalline cellulose may be only 1/10 as strong as carbon nanotubes – currently the strongest known structural material [3, 4] – it may cost 50–1,000 times less to produce [5, 6]. Engineered biocomposites employing nanocrystalline cellulose reinforcement could soon provide advanced performance, durability, value, service life, and utility, while at the same time being a fully sustainable technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 119-144
National Category
Bio Materials
Research subject
Wood and Bionanocomposites
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20330DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-45232-1_52Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84943389549Local ID: 3f8256e3-1dac-4685-bab5-00fc041dc23dISBN: 978-3-642-45231-4 (print)ISBN: 978-3-642-45232-1 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-20330DiVA, id: diva2:993374
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150116 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Jonoobi, Mehdi

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CiteExportLink to record
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