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Sequential Competitive Facility Location Problems
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
2015 (English)In: Modeling Discrete Competitive Facility Location, Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015, p. 15-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The formalization of this class of problem and the fundamental complexity results were established by Hakimi [28]. Following the game introduced by von Stackelberg [76], Hakimi [28] presented the two basic problems in sequential location analysis, the centroid and medianoid problems. These two problems are faced by the leader and the follower, respectively. The leader attempts to locate p( ≥ 1) facilities knowing that a follower will in turn locate his r( ≥ 1) facilities based on the leader’s chosen locations; this is the (r | p)-centroid problem. The follower knows the set X p that indicates where the leader’s facilities are located, and solves an (r | X p )-medianoid problem. Customers choose among the facilities according to a function of the distance between themselves and the facilities, preferring always the closest. This is the so-called binary customer choice. The formulation of the problems is based on the assumption that co-location is not allowed and if, by any chance the distance from a customer to the closest facility of the two competitors is the same, the customer always prefers the leader’s facility. The demand of the customer is also considered to be inelastic with respect to the distance traveled.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 15-32
Series
SpringerBriefs in Optimization, ISSN 2190-8354
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Logistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-20669DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-21341-5_3Local ID: 6f09b068-de3d-4992-9856-6e5d4388eee3ISBN: 978-3-319-21340-8 (print)ISBN: 978-3-319-21341-5 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-20669DiVA, id: diva2:993713
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20150818 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Karakitsiou, Athanasia

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