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Warnings and placement positions in automobiles
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3827-0295
2008 (English)In: 2008 AHFE International: 2nd International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics jointly with 12th International conference on Human Aspect of Advanced Manufaturing (HAAMAHA) : 14-17 July 2008, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada USA, Louisville, KY: USA Publishing , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The concern for mental overload from warnings has been considered over a longer period of time and warnings are being added in vehicles and icons are being tested for understandability but perceptions of the importance of each specific warning and its placement in the driving compartment seems to have had lesser importance in research. Such as, too much visual information presented to the driver or confusing warnings has showed to cause overload and, hence, reduce the driver's ability to perform safely. A dilemma the automobile industry is facing today is how to expand the ways visual information via warnings can be presented to the driver without increasing the cognitive workload, which, in turn, increases the chances for distraction. This study has attempts to understand the effects of warnings placement on the drivers' ability to respond to them in varied driving conditions. Twenty respondents drove a fixed based high fidelity driving simulator though 15km of light to moderate traffic in both rural and urban areas while responding to warnings placed in Head Up Display (HUD) (straight forward 12° below the line of sight), Head Down Display (HDD) (straight forward on the instrument panel behind the steering wheel ca 20° below the forward line of sight), Infotainment Display (IFD) (30° towards the middle of the automobile from the driver on the instrument panel and 15° below the forward line of sight), and the Center Stack Display (CSD) (30° to the center of the automobile from the driver on the instrument panel and 30° below the forward line of sight approximately where the stereo is typically found). Ten respondents received warnings in both the HUD and HDD simultaneously while the other ten respondents received the same ten warnings in the same traffic situations but instead the warnings were presented in one of the four placements. Response time was measured by the time it took to press a button which was easily accessible at the end of the turn signal level and by eye tracking data. The respondents' response times to the warnings (via ambient vision), their gaze patterns, average speed, maneuverability, and their own subjective responses were tested. Results showed that there were no significant differences measured between the baseline and experiment runs due to the simple nature of the tasks while significant differences were found in the response times relating to the different placements. Warnings for serious failures and those pertaining to the vehicles mechanical operation were preferred to be placed in the HUD while warnings for maintenance and service along with reminders were chosen to be placed in the HDD. Response times and driving was perceived to be better when using the HUD while the CSD was considered too far away to be looked at for warnings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Louisville, KY: USA Publishing , 2008.
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Industrial Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-29947Local ID: 3951de40-c11a-11dd-a054-000ea68e967bISBN: 9781606437124 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-29947DiVA, id: diva2:1003174
Conference
International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics : 14/07/2008 - 17/07/2008
Projects
OPTIVe - Optimised system integration for safe interaction in vehicles
Note

Godkänd; 2008; 20081203 (phitre)

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved

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Tretten, Phillip

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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