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'I have to show an "I can" attitude': social enactments of gender and technology in mobile telephony communication practices
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4920-9182
2010 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Intentional Missed calling referred to as beeping through the mobile phone, is a phenomenon that has taken the African continent by storm. Giving specific attention to relational beeps, this study analyses the practice through an intersectional theoretical lens, revealing a practice deeply imbued with social categorical orders. A year of ethnographic study in Uganda (2008) informed this study. Document analyses and twenty-three conversational interviews with friends, family and acquaintances with whom rapport had been established socio-culturally contextualised the rules associated with the practice prior to qualitative interviews with fifty three university students and recent graduates (20-28). Targeting young dating couples the focus on gender highlights complex rules to the practice that may deter some of the informants in this study from beeping. The same informants basing on other social relationships such as kinships can be found to engage in the same activity. Beeping is therefore a multilayered exercise that each individual at some socio-relational level engages in. It is the relationship to the beep recipient that negotiates this practice. The current study offers as a contribution to existing beeping analyses, an intersectional understanding of this practice. This study differs from previous beeping research, by analysing different gender-based negotiations that confront beeping practices. Mapping local, diverse expressions of masculinities and femininities at the intersection of beeping activities the study offers some recommendations on how Information Communication Technologies (ICT) in general can be useful signals of understanding sociological order.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Gender and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30280Local ID: 40a41220-0921-11e0-b767-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-30280DiVA, id: diva2:1003507
Conference
4S Annual Meeting : 25/08/2010 - 29/08/2010
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20101216 (carwam)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

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Wamala, Caroline

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf