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Co-distribution in rural areas: a case study
2002 (English)In: Preprints, International Working Seminar on Production Economics, 2002Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pajala, a village and a community in the north of Sweden, has 7500 inhabitants on an area of 7900 km2 which mean 1 inhabitant per km2. The numbers of inhabitants in the municipality are unfortunately decreasing. To stop the decreasing problem, Pajala need more chances of work and therefore they need more successful companies. A company competing on the global market (and the Swedish market), to be a part in a supply chain network, must mostly show high delivery service and short lead times. Is this really possible for a company placed in Pajala? Approximately twenty different transport-suppliers transport goods to and from companies in Pajala. But most of the transport-suppliers transport goods only once a week. Companies in Pajala, to be able to compete, should have the opportunity to send goods any day they want to send for shortening the delivery times to customers. One solution to this may be codistribution. Co-distribution means that different transportation-suppliers transport their goods in only one truck that goes to and from Pajala. A study has been performed in Pajala to investigate if co-distribution has any benefits in rural areas. A collection of data has been carried out mainly through questionnaires but also with interviews. Companies in Pajala and transportation-suppliers have been asked to answer questions like: How much goods do the companies order? How much goods do the transportation-suppliers have in their trucks? What do companies/transportation-suppliers know about co-distribution? The questionnaires show that 43% of the transportation-suppliers don’t drive trucks to/from Pajala with the luggage space full. This means that co-distribution and minimizing of the numbers of distribution is possible. The investigation shows that 54% of the companies don’t know that there are other transportation-suppliers than the one they have engaged. 59% of the companies haven’t thought about or don’t have knowledge about the word and meaning of co-distribution. These and other examples from the study will be discussed and presented in the article.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Industrial Logistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-30297Local ID: 40ed80f0-77e3-11db-962b-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-30297DiVA, id: diva2:1003524
Conference
International Working Seminar on Production Economics : 18/02/2002 - 22/02/2002
Note
Godkänd; 2002; 20061119 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved

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Hageback, Charlotte

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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