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A critical exploration of the relation between silence, education and assessment
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3657-6223
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Education, Language, and Teaching.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0429-570X
2013 (English)In: PESA 2013: Measuring Up in Education : Proceedings of the 43rd Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2013, Melbourne: Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia , 2013, p. 6-12Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Western societies have become increasingly knowledge and information based economies, and educational reforms have put measurable knowledge and assessment at the top of the agenda in order to create effective schools. In this paper, we critically explore the relation between silence, education and assessment, drawing mainly on the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and to some extent the work of Otto Friedrich Bollnow. Our overall aim is to open up for discussion the significance of silence in education, with a focus on the interplay between silence and assessment.Some students are experienced by others or by themselves as silent. Perhaps, they are neither given, nor do they take, the space that is required for participation in a conversation. They remain silent even though the ongoing discussion wakens their reflections and thoughts, or even if they know the answer to questions asked. Merleau-Ponty emphasises, that there is something that exists beyond what is said, something which cannot be communicated verbally, which he calls a silent and implicit language. Since exams are mainly based on words, the silent dimensions of students’ knowledge and achievement may be neglected. Exams, written or verbally, thus run the risk of being limitations for fair assessment. To stop and think about silence can draw attention to the importance of listening to the silent and implicit language of students in different teaching situations, especially when it comes to assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne: Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia , 2013. p. 6-12
Keyword [en]
Social sciences - Education
Keyword [sv]
Socialvetenskap - Pedagogik
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31149Local ID: 539ae223-9a36-4122-a05c-a35734fbce41ISBN: 9780646904191 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-31149DiVA, id: diva2:1004379
Conference
PESA Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia : Measuring up in education 06/12/2013 - 09/12/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20140304 (suswes)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved

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http://education.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/910394/PESA_2013_Edited_Conference_Proceedings.pdf

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