Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Enhancing Student motivation: "raise the bar"
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7108-6356
2014 (English)In: Design education & human technology relations: proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands 4th - 5th September 2014 / [ed] Erik Bohemia; Arthur Eger; Wouter Eggink, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2014, p. 414-419Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The quest for enhancing student motivation, commitment and performance in higher education is anever-present struggle for university teachers. Of course, the hunt for a good grade is something that isvery central for students, but as a teacher you would like to reach further and find a deeper, morepersonal motivation within each student. A hypothesis that was investigated was that students willaccept high demands if they are clearly defined and presented directly in the beginning instead ofbeing introduced gradually during the course. In the present course, a team of six teachers was puttogether in order to be able to handle the students’ need for coaching and support. The course includedmultiple sub-deadlines concluded by status presentations, called Design Reviews, where the groupsupdated the teaching team and other groups on the project’s progress. The Design Reviews includedboth an oral presentation of five minutes and a written memorandum, called PM. Each student wasresponsible for one oral presentation and one PM. Examination of the course was based on the finalproject result as well as on performance during the Design Reviews. The conclusions from thisapproach are that the general motivation was increased. The project results were very good andincluded several innovative solutions. Student reaction to the high demands was positive but teachercoaching is a very important factor for keeping this on a manageable and stimulating level for thestudents and preventing it from being an oppressive stress factor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2014. p. 414-419
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Industrial Design; Product Innovation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-31836Local ID: 621e4373-cd7d-497b-acbe-083b1331ac9dISBN: 978-1-904670-56-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-31836DiVA, id: diva2:1005070
Conference
Engineering & Product Design Education : Design Education & Human Technology Relations 04/09/2014 - 05/09/2014
Note
Godkänd; 2014; 20140919 (ahak)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

http://www.iepde.org/epde14/

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Håkansson, AndersTörlind, Peter
By organisation
Innovation and Design
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 277 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf