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Lateral cutting forces for different tooth geometries and cutting directions
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0145-080X
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Wood Science and Engineering.
2012 (English)In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 126-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lateral (sideways) cutting forces were measured for 6 different tooth geometries when cutting green spruce and pine heartwood. The teeth were intended for use on circular saw blades for the rip sawing of logs. The 6 tooth geometries were designated straight, pointed, bevelled, rounded, trapezoidal and hollowed out. Cutting speed was 15 m/s, feed per tooth was 0.3 mm and the cutting directions were 90°–90° (rip sawing) and 90°–0° (milling), with two different variants of growth ring angles for each direction. The tools were tested in sharp conditions, in dull conditions and in a dull condition with a corner broken off. All lateral forces were small when cutting with sharp teeth, except for the rounded and bevelled teeth. Lateral forces increased with wear, except for a period of initial wear where the lateral forces were reduced. High wear resulted in greater lateral forces, most probably due to unsymmetrical wear. Growth ring direction did not generally affect lateral forces. The teeth with acute corners, which were the straight and hollowed out tooth, were most sensitive to a broken off corner. The lateral forces in the cases of wood cutting at 90°–90° increased less with wear compared to the 90°–0° cases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 7, no 3, p. 126-133
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32650DOI: 10.1080/17480272.2012.662699Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84866855032Local ID: 734f1613-7514-4d5d-9393-8de34d000886OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-32650DiVA, id: diva2:1005884
Conference
International Wood Machining Seminar : 07/06/2011 - 10/06/2011
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120607 (matse); Konferensartikel i tidskriftAvailable from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Ekevad, MatsCristovao, LuisMarklund, Birger

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