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How to Get a Social Licence to Mine
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2840-8510
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1091-5039
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8061-7208
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the paper is to discuss socially sustainable development in the mining industry and the communities surrounding the mines. The discussions are based on results from a prestudy and literature review on mining and sustainable development conducted during 2013–2014 at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden. ‘A social licence to mine’ is important for the mining industry, but the social dimension is a relatively underdeveloped dimension when it comes to sustainable development in general and the mining industry in particular, one reason probably being the lack of effective methods for capturing social impacts. The mining industry and the surrounding communities face many challenges that provide both possibilities and obstacles to socially sustainable development; eg aspects such as gender, work conditions and cultural aspects. For example, a strong mining workplace culture and community identity can createstrong cohesion but also lead to excluding certain groups, rejecting new ideas and reinforcing obsolete values. Other challenges include recruitment, as well as health and safety in relation to an increased use of fly-in-fly-out, contractors and automation of mining. Some challenges relate to the effects of fluctuations in the mining market. There is a lack of research that links attitudes, policies and activities within companies to their impact on the wider community, and vice versa. Future research should also include the development of methods and indicators for social sustainability relevant for mining – in other words: how do mining companies get ‘a social licence to mine’?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Gender and Technology; Industrial Work Environment; Human Work Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-32876Local ID: 783e4c18-025a-4501-93e0-5820745196b9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-32876DiVA, id: diva2:1006110
Conference
International Future Mining Conference : 04/11/2015 - 06/11/2015
Note
Godkänd; 2015; 20151125 (andbra)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Abrahamsson, LenaLööw, JoelNygren, MagnusSegerstedt, Eugenia

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