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Specular and transparent objects in moving range cameras: active reduction of ambiguities
Linköpings universitet.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
1994 (English)In: Intelligent Robots and Computer Vision XIII: 3D Vision, Product Inspection, and Active Vision / [ed] David P. Casasent, Bellingham, Wash, 1994, p. 453-469Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper is written to further understanding of the basic limitations of eye-in-hand range cameras for the handling of specular and transparent objects. The basic underlying assumption for a range camera is one diffuse reflex. Specular and transparent objects usually give multiple reflections interpreted as different types of `ghosts' in the range images. These `ghosts' are likely to cause serous errors during gripping operations. As the robot moves some of these `ghosts' move inconsistently with the true motion. In this paper we study, experimentally and theoretically, how the range measurements can be integrated in a consistent way during the motion of the robot. The paper is experimental with emphasis on parts with `optical complications' including multiple scattering. Occlusion is not studied in this paper. Some of our findings include: (1) For scenes with one plane mirror there is a complete understanding of the `deambiguation' by motion. Also, the coordinates of the mirror can be estimated without one single observation of the mirror itself. The other objects in the scene are not `mirror like.' (2) For polished steel cylinders, the inclination and radius can be estimated from the curved ray-traces on plane matte surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bellingham, Wash, 1994. p. 453-469
Series
Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X ; 2354
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Research subject
Industrial Electronics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-33105DOI: 10.1117/12.189114Local ID: 7e316cc0-79b6-11dd-b356-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-33105DiVA, id: diva2:1006340
Conference
Intelligent Robots and Computer Vision : 3D Vision, Product Inspection, and Active Vision 31/10/1994 - 02/11/1994
Note
Godkänd; 1994; 20080903 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved

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Wernersson, Åke

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