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Direct hit development: Thermo mechanical sheet metal forming of components for load carrying aero engine structures
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Mechanics of Solid Materials.
2010 (English)In: FLYGTEKNIK 2010, Flyg- och rymdindustri 2020–2040, 2010Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A successful development project in the modern industry can be characterised by “direct hit” development work, in which the accuracy is high and the lead time is short. The ability to realise successful projects with short lead times has become increasingly important to maintain competitiveness. To increase the competitiveness of the Swedish aerospace industry, alternative manufacturing processes for static load carrying aero engine structures are desired. Traditionally, the structures consist of large-scaled single castings delivered by only a few international suppliers. New manufacturing processes imply in this case fabricated components which mean that complete structures are built from simple forgings, sheet metals and small castings by welding and heat treatment. The concept of fabrication take advantage of the possibility to increase the own level of processing, reduce weight and thereby fuel consumption but also product cost. Concurrently new manufacturing methods for formed sheet metal parts and relations with new sub-suppliers need to be developed and introduced. One challenge in producing complete structures based on fabrication is related to the prediction ability for springback and shape deviation by simulation, in order to attain tolerances in an effective way. In the aerospace industry extremely high demands on safety and reliability exists which require good knowledge regarding the effects of the manufacturing process on the material and the influence on the resultant properties, through the whole manufacturing chain. The advanced Finite Element (FE) technology in combination with computer capacity makes precise analyses possible assuming that proper material descriptions are used. Analyses of sheet metal forming can provide information of formability, thinning, shape deviation, resultant mechanical properties and residual stress state which is important input to analyses of subsequent manufacturing processes such as welding and heat treatment. This presentation summarise results and work procedures obtained in research and development projects regarding short lead time design, compensation and manufacturing of deep drawing tools for titanium and nickel based alloys. The mechanical properties are studied by performing material tests and experimental data are used to calibrate mathematical material descriptions. Typical for titanium alloys used in aero engine applications is that the mechanical properties depend on the thermo-mechanical loading history of the blank, rolling direction, load direction in tension or compression, strain rate and temperature. The high strength properties in combination with low ductility at room temperature often imply that sheet metal forming has to be performed at elevated temperatures. Nickel based super alloys such as Inconel 718 has high room temperature ductility but due to the high strength properties, springback is often considerable in formed sheet metal parts. Responses such as punch force, draw-in, formability, thinning, strain distribution and springback are evaluated using FE-simulations of sheet metal forming in order to secure forming concepts and obtain virtual geometries within shape and thickness tolerances. Tool surfaces are compensated for springback, if necessary, using the *INTERFACE_COMPENSATED_NEW capability in LS-DYNA v971. The compensated FE-tool surfaces are used to generate high quality surfaces suitable for the milling process. Design and component solutions for hot forming tools such as heating and temperature regulation, insulation, lubricants and tool material selection are evaluated. Depending on the choice of material description, promising agreement between predicted and measured values has been obtained. Isotropic material descriptions are compared with models including anisotropy, where the latter was found important to obtain accurate predictions of strain localisation and shape deviation. The work substantiates the idea that it is possible to realise development projects for sheet metal applications in titanium Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 accurately and with no further need for modifications of the tools, which is of outmost importance when developing tools at a short lead time.The need for sheet metal parts, simulation results and increased insight to the forming procedures from the Swedish aero engine industry is provided for in the projects. One main objective is to create possibilities for Swedish SMEs to develop into new sub-suppliers of sheet metal components for the aerospace industry. Collaborating companies and universities in the research and development projects are Volvo Aero Corporation, Industrial Development Centre (IUC) in Olofström AB, Luleå University of Technology and a few SMEs with practical experience in forming high performance materials. Engineering Research Nordic AB and LFT in Erlangen, Germany, are also involved in the projects. Future work is focused on studies of additional commercial geometries in which forming concepts, FE-models and material descriptions are further developed in order to obtain competitive cold and hot forming processes with minimal consumption of material. The aim considering hot forming of titanium is to fully take advantage of temperature and time dependent effects as important process parameters in the development process of new hot forming concepts. The objective is to produce components with high accuracy and low product cost.The research funding by VINNOVA - NFFP 4 and 5 for SME and Volvo Aero Corporation are gratefully acknowledged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010.
National Category
Applied Mechanics
Research subject
Solid Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-35520Local ID: a12ffc64-46a0-415e-a68f-7df2720ab616OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-35520DiVA, id: diva2:1008773
Conference
Flygteknik 2010 : 18/10/2010 - 19/10/2010
Note
Godkänd; 2010; 20140114 (evawes)Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2017-11-25Bibliographically approved

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