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Inventory and production management in construction industry: an introduction
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Structural and Construction Engineering.
2008 (English)Conference paper, Presentation (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Construction Industry can and have been criticised for high waste of construction materials (plasterboards, windows, doors, toilet equipments etc, even organised thefts must be suspected); low quality (e.g. mould in new houses); very conservative management and also conservative trade unions. All this ending up and creating low efficiency. Investigations show that the Construction Industry has a lower productivity and efficiency than the ordinary manufacturing industry. We show a short overview of the administrative systems used in Construction Industry (in the Nordic countries). Traditional ERP-systems (like SAP/R3, Oracle etc) are not used in the construction processes. Planning and scheduling of a construction project is to a high extent still done without help from a computer system (compared to ordinary manufacturing companies). We present and discuss arguments why traditional ERP-systems not are used; e.g. a traditional work centre does not exist in a Construction project!? We then argue how a construction project should be notified, in what stages; and what in what stages of the project. Such that plans for purchase, supply and other necessary resources can be created; such that the "critical line" continuously can be followed, studied and overruns avoided. Necessary ingredients are prescriptions (e.g. how a wall is built from plasterboards, which is not the same but something similar to ‘routings' in traditional manufacturing); tasks (e.g. building an inner wall at a special work location); resources (people and machines with special skills that perform the different tasks); items (construction materials, a task to be performed requires resources, items and tools). For the tasks immediate predecessors must be determined. 3D-presentations are necessary and the work locations, place, are much more important and necessary than in a traditional ERP-system. Subcontractors are much more common also compared to traditional ERP-systems and a resource that must be well considered in the planning and scheduling of the construction project.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008.
Research subject
Construction Engineering and Management; Industrial Logistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-37179Local ID: b1d50370-ba20-11dd-b223-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-37179DiVA: diva2:1010677
Conference
International Symposium on Inventories : 22/08/2008 - 26/08/2008
Note
Godkänd; 2008; 20110614 (ysko)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03Bibliographically approved

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