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Effects of different shielding gas compositions on the process of cw CO2 laser welding in the hyperbaric range
University of Essex.
University of Essex.
Luleå tekniska universitet.
Luleå tekniska universitet.
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1996 (English)In: XI International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers and High-Power Laser Conference / [ed] Denis R. Hall; Howard J. Baker, Bellingham, Wash: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 1996, p. 530-533Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A continuous carbon-dioxide laser of 1.35 kW has been used to study the welding of 5 mm thick stainless steel for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 MPa in increments of 0.1 MPa. Experimental data, including penetration depths, weld widths, and in some cases weld pool profiles, has been obtained for each value of the pressure using different mixtures of argon and helium shielding gases. In a previous paper it has been reported that keyhole welding could not be carried out for pressures significantly in excess of atmospheric pressure using pure argon and nitrogen shielding gases, but that the process was possible at pressures up to 0.8 MPa using helium. In the present paper the critical pressure for keyhole welding is determined as a function of the mixed shielding gas composition. The laser material interaction is analyzed by solving the heat conduction equation with line and point heat sources representing the keyhole and plume respectively. The line source strength is itself calculated from consideration of the inverse bremsstrahlung and Fresnel absorption processes in the keyhole. It is concluded that successful laser welding in the hyperbaric range crucially hinges on good plume control through the effective delivery of an appropriate shielding gas mixture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bellingham, Wash: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 1996. p. 530-533
Series
Proceedings of SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, ISSN 0277-786X ; 3092
National Category
Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
Research subject
Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-38593DOI: 10.1117/12.270124Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-62249140958Local ID: d09d1270-79b1-11dd-b356-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-38593DiVA, id: diva2:1012093
Conference
International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers : 25/08/1996 - 25/08/1996
Note
Godkänd; 1996; 20080903 (ysko)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Powell, JohnMagnusson, Claes

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