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Degrees of freedom?: disclosing rendering processes of virtual bodies
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
2008 (English)In: MMWW08: 10th international interdisciplinary congress of womens, mundos de mujeres/Women's world 2008 : Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Madrid (España) 3 - 9 July, 2008, Madrid: Universidad Complutense de Madrid , 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One of the challenges when designing and programming generic characters populating different virtual environments (VE) is to improve the realism of the animation (cf. Magnenat-Thalmann & Thalmann 1990:77; Musse & Thalmann 2001:152,154). Thus, designers and programmers seem to endeavour for synthetic actors to adopt "real" body movements and "realistic" embodied behaviour. Nonetheless, employing parameters of "realism" as points of departures tends to naturalize certain movements and behaviours as they turns into self-evident actions for how generic virtual characters are developed.

Abstract [en]

One of the challenges when designing and programming generic characters populating different virtual environments (VE) is to improve the realism of the animation (cf. Magnenat-Thalmann & Thalmann 1990:77; Musse & Thalmann 2001:152,154). Thus, designers and programmers seem to endeavour for synthetic actors  to adopt "real" body movements and "realistic" embodied behaviour. Nonetheless, employing parameters of "realism" as points of departures tends to naturalize certain movements and behaviours as they turns into self-evident actions for how generic virtual characters are developed. In order to explicate the design processes, I understand them as standardized activities (cf. Star 1991), in that they illustrate "the misfits between conventional technological systems and the needs of individual "(Star 1991:36). By this means; guidelines when constructing objects to be digitized, easily transform the human body into a standardized tool that - following Verbeek (2005:79,88) - becomes ready-to-hand; a utilized instrument, disappearing in usefulness. Requiring no attention for itself, the body is consequently adopting certain positions in order to achieve the best result when designing and programming virtual characters and movements which is why this paper bids to explicate the endeavor to create realism, diversity and complexity, when designing and programming generic virtual actors in virtual environments.[1] I've adopted the language used in some of the works studied in order to refer to the generic bodies inhabiting VE as synthetic actors, virtual characters and virtual agents (cf. Magnenat-Thalmann & Thalmann 1990). Saying this, I nonetheless wish to pinpoint that I understand these realities - rather than being regarded as separated entities - as inextricable part of each other (cf. Žižek 2001:18).  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Madrid: Universidad Complutense de Madrid , 2008.
Research subject
Gender and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-38862Local ID: d6616330-6789-11dd-9c8e-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-38862DiVA: diva2:1012364
Conference
International Interdisciplinary Congress of Women, Mundos de Mujeres / Women's world : 03/07/2008 - 09/07/2008
Note
Godkänd; 2008; Bibliografisk uppgift: Del av programpunkten: Gendered bodies online : representation in text, photography and animation, tillsammans med Redi Koobak, Katherine Harrison, Monica Obreja, Linköpings universitet.; 20080811 (jenolo)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03Bibliographically approved

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