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Conforming Spheres: Limitations in Higher Music Education
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0047-1887
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presentation wants to visualize and create an interactive discussion about the legitimation of higher music education within popular music – its obstacle and potentials as an institution of plurality within a university context.There are some well-known conditions that are more or less tabooed and sometimes act as sources for the noncompliance in institutional flexibility. The schools of music are traditionally constructed by three; at least, “biotopes” of definable thinking and acting from which students, personnel and management have experience of and are recruited from. These fields are the conservatoire tradition, the Free Church’s organizations (perhaps mainly in Sweden), and the recycling system of musicians/teachers inside music institutions on different levels of education. This trinity of spheres brings on shared experiences of expertise, social training and familiarity but also exclusion, non-equality, self-righteousness, anti-intellectual preferences and conventional preferences. This is not by any sense exclusive for higher music education but in a faculty that could facilitate innovative expressions, self-independence and global engagement – why not go for it!Circumstances above results in the fact that even if popular music (in a broad sense) is the essence of music activities in the conservatories in Sweden, the learning contexts are still predictable bosoms for music students all the way from voluntary music school (during elementary school years), through aesthetic gymnasia, pre-educations like folk high schools, straight forward to the School of music to, perhaps, a teacher education for elementary school and voluntary music school. As a consequence of this recycling situation the plurality and differences that e.g. Biesta, 2006 highlights as necessary, can perhaps be linked more to genre expansion than to democratic and existential content.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Music Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-40222Local ID: f4343660-815a-447a-9812-96c9c7865f2fOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-40222DiVA, id: diva2:1013744
Conference
ISME World Conference : 23/07/2016 - 30/07/2016
Note
Godkänd; 2016; 20160719 (agul)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved

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Gullberg, Anna-Karin

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf