Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Influence of soil particle size, organic carbon and pH on mercury distribution and dissolution in contaminated soil
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
Department of Environmental Engineering, Swedish Geotechnical Institute.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7158-4662
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1442-1573
2013 (English)In: Influence of soil particle size, organic carbon and pH on mercury distribution and dissolution in contaminated soil, 2013, p. 45-Conference paper, Meeting abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mercury (Hg) cannot be destroyed therefore only two principal processes are available for the treatment of Hg-contaminated soil: 1) separation of Hg from soil (through wet-sieving and/or chemical extraction), or 2) stabilization of Hg within the soil (through chemical immobilisation or stabilisation/solidification). If Hg separation is used, soil can be cleaned while Hg recovered. A complex matrix may, however, cause low treatment efficiency. Therefore, prior to selecting the suitable treatment technique, an understanding of Hg solubility and distribution in particle size fractions of the contaminated soil is necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential for applying soil washing technology to clean Hg contaminated soil based on Hg distribution in soil particle size fractions, Hg solubility in water and pH-dependant Hg dissolution. Soil contaminated by different industrial processes (e.g. waste dump, chlor–alkali process, harbour activities) was collected from Tidermans padding area upstream of Göta River, Sweden during the site remediation. The soil was dry sieved into particle-size fractions of <0.063 mm, 0.063–0.125 mm, 0.125–0.25 mm, 0.25–0.5 mm, 0.5–1 mm, 1–2 mm and 2–4 mm and along with the bulk soil were analysed for total Hg and total organic carbon (TOC). A batch leaching test at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) 10 was performed to determine water soluble Hg and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). A pH-static leaching test was performed to determine Hg solubility in the pH range of 3-11. All particle size fractions contained Hg above the Swedish guideline value for contaminated soil (2.5 mg/kg for less sensitive land use). Total Hg concentrations decreased with increasing particle size (except fraction 1-2 mm), ranging from 48.70 mg/kg to 10.29 mg/kg. The TOC contents were similar in all size fractions from 8.72 to 10.88 and had no correlation with the total Hg. Water soluble Hg was low in all size fractions, making up for 0.04% to 0.12% of the total Hg. Contents of DOC declined from fine to large fractions, however, no correlation between Hg solubility and DOC content has been observed. Mercury desorption was affected by pH and fluctuated throughout the tested pH range. The least Hg dissolution was achieved at pH=3 and pH 9 in all fractions and the bulk soil, while the dissolution peaks were observed at pH=5 and pH=11. The results show that the soil washing applying wet-sieving and particle separation method would be unfeasible since elevated Hg concentrations are distributed in all tested soil particle fractions and water solubility of Hg is very low. Chemical extraction focusing on pH 5 or pH 11 might improve the Hg removal. Geochemical modelling is being performed to understand this Hg behaviour in the studied soil.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. p. 45-
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-40233Local ID: f483d68f-ca19-431a-9532-cc313b1c6e18OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-40233DiVA, id: diva2:1013755
Conference
International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant : 28/07/2013 - 02/08/2013
Note
Godkänd; 2013; 20130927 (xuajin)Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Xu, JingyingLagerkvist, AndersKumpiene, Jurate

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Xu, JingyingLagerkvist, AndersKumpiene, Jurate
By organisation
Geosciences and Environmental Engineering
Other Environmental Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 85 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf