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The black family: family relations in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou and Toni Morrison's Sula and Beloved
2004 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Family and family-relationships play an important part in the lives of the major characters in the three novels, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou and Toni Morrison’s Sula and Beloved. All of the portrayed individuals operate within the boundaries of a family structure but their roles may vary according to gender and social context. There are also reasons to believe that the family structure differs between the portrayed families in the examined novels and the conventional form of a family unit which originates from a white normative model where a family consists of a mother, a father and their mutual children. The black family unit often consists of different elements and there are grounds to speak of an extended family when referring to it.It is not only mothers and fathers who raise children in the black family. The responsibility is often transferred to older relatives and non-family friends who have the opportunity to step in and help. The way in which family relations are portrayed in the aforementioned novels, is examined in two chapters. The first chapter deals with the male characters. There are many different personalities described in the texts and their views upon family life and relations vary. Some of the characters are real family men while others seem to have other priorities. The second chapter examines the female characters in a similar fashion. They also differ from each other and their approach to family, husbands and children are equally diverse. There are housewives and matriarchs among the female individuals as well as struggling and suffering women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004.
Keywords [en]
Humanities Theology, Family relations, black family, Morrison, Angelou, racism
Keywords [sv]
Humaniora, Teologi
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-52874ISRN: LTU-DUPP--04/14--SELocal ID: 9f50f3a2-0a67-4967-904c-6db9199869ceOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-52874DiVA, id: diva2:1026246
Subject / course
Student thesis, at least 15 credits
Educational program
English, master's level
Examiners
Note
Validerat; 20101217 (root)Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf