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Preparation of differently modified gold surfaces for the culturing of endothelial cells
2000 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

In order to learn more about how endothelial cells grow on different surfaces it is necessary to find an appropriate surface coating where the cells bind and proliferate and where, at the same time, it is possible to study them. In the present work gold surfaces were modified by use of molecules containing a thiol group (-SH). The chosen molecules were: (a) 1-hexadecanethiol, HS(CH2)15CH3 (-CH3), (b) 16-mercaptohexadecanol, HS(CH2)16OH (-OH), (c) oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated alkanethiolate, HS(CH2)16(CH2CH2O)6OH (-EG6), and (d) cysteamine, HS(CH2)2NH2. Long chain alkanethiolates form spontaneously an organized monolayer, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). First, the adsorption of collagen I to the different surfaces was examined with ellipsometry. The results show that the order of binding efficiency in terms of removability by washing with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, detergent) for the different surfaces is: cysteamine > -OH > -CH3 > -EG6. Next, bovine aorta endothelial cells were cultivated on the surfaces, with and without collagen I coating. The results show that the protein binding strength clearly corresponds to the efficiency of cell adhesion. Thus, it seems that differences in cell growth and attachment are related to the binding of collagen I. The most effective endothelial cell culture surface was the cysteamine coated surface, both coated with collagen I and non-coated. The least efficient surface was the EG6-surface. The experiments indicate that one covalently bound monolayer of collagen I is sufficient for the culturing of endothelial cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000.
Keywords [en]
Technology, biomaterials, self-assembled monolayers (SAM), endothelial, cells, collagen I, cell culturing, protein adsorption, ellipsometry
Keywords [sv]
Teknik
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-57093ISRN: LTU-EX--00/192--SELocal ID: dcb84649-299b-428d-8dab-c772dc1d90b4OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-57093DiVA, id: diva2:1030480
Subject / course
Student thesis, at least 30 credits
Educational program
Civil Engineering programmes 1997-2000, master's level
Examiners
Note
Validerat; 20101217 (root)Available from: 2016-10-04 Created: 2016-10-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf