Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evaluation of factors affecting soil carbon sequestration services of stormwater wet retention ponds in varying climate zones.
Biological & Agricultural Engineering, North Carolina State University.
Biological & Agricultural Engineering, Kansas State University.
Centre for Urban Greenery and Ecology, National Parks Board, 1E Cluny Road, 259569, Singapore.
Soil Science, North Carolina State University.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 9
2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 583, 133-141 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The carbon sequestration services of stormwater wet retention ponds were investigated in four different climates: U.S., Northern Sweden, Southern Sweden, and Singapore, representing a range of annual mean temperatures, growing season lengths and rainfall depths: geographic factors that were not statistically compared, but have great effect on carbon (C) accumulation. A chronosequence was used to estimate C accumulations rates; C accumulation and decomposition rates were not directly measured. C accumulated significantly over time in vegetated shallow water areas (0–30 cm) in the USA (78.4 g C m− 2 yr− 1), in vegetated temporary inundation zones in Sweden (75.8 g C m− 2 yr− 1), and in all ponds in Singapore (135 g C m− 2 yr− 1). Vegetative production appeared to exert a stronger influence on relative C accumulation rates than decomposition. Comparing among the four climatic zones, the effects of increasing rainfall and growing season lengths (vegetative production) outweighed the effects of higher temperature on decomposition rates. Littoral vegetation was a significant source to the soil C pool relative to C sources draining from watersheds. Establishment of vegetation in the shallow water zones of retention ponds is vital to providing a C source to the soil. Thus, the width of littoral shelves containing this vegetation along the perimeter may be increased if C sequestration is a design goal. This assessment establishes that stormwater wet retention ponds can sequester C across different climate zones with generally annual rainfall and lengths of growing season being important general factors for C accumulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 583, 133-141 p.
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Urban Water Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-61478DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.01.040ISI: 000394556400015PubMedID: 28104334Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85009781834OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-61478DiVA: diva2:1066056
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-07 (rokbeg)

Available from: 2017-01-17 Created: 2017-01-17 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Al-Rubaei, AhmedBlecken, Godecke-TobiasViklander, Maria

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Al-Rubaei, AhmedBlecken, Godecke-TobiasViklander, Maria
By organisation
Architecture and Water
In the same journal
Science of the Total Environment
Water Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 245 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf