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Making eyes with robots: Readiness to engage in human-robot-interaction depends on the attribution of intentionality
Department of Experimental Psychology, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich.
Department of Experimental Psychology, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich.
Number of Authors: 3
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society annual meeting: Sept. 30 - Oct. 4, 2013, San Diego, California USA, 2013, 1174-1178 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the most important aims of social robotics is to improve Human-Robot Interaction by providing robots with means to understand observed behavior and to predict upcoming actions of their in-teraction partners. The most reliable source for inferring the action goals of interaction partners is their gaze direction. Hence, to anticipate upcoming actions, it is necessary to identify where others are currently look-ing at and to shift the attentional focus to the same location. Interestingly, it has been shown that observing robot gaze direction also induces attentional shifts to the location that is gazed-at by the robot. Given this, gaze direction can be actively used by the robot to direct the attentional focus of interaction partners to im-portant events in the world. In this paper, we review findings from two studies indicating that the readiness to engage attentional resources in interactions with robots is modulated by the degree to which intentionality can be attributed to the robot: Robots believed to behave similar to humans cause stronger gaze-cueing effects than robots perceived as machines, independently of their physical appearance. Based on these find-ings, and on results from a pilot study with a sample of patients diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), we derive guidelines for improving human-robot interaction by emulating social gaze behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 1174-1178 p.
Series
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Annual Meeting, ISSN 1071-1813
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Engineering Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62128DOI: 10.1177/1541931213571261ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84889781254ISBN: 9780945289432 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62128DiVA: diva2:1076341
Conference
57th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting - 2013, HFES 2013, San Diego, CA, United States, 30 September - 4 October 2013
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2017-02-22Bibliographically approved

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Wykowska, Agnieszka
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf