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Prediction of top-of-rail friction control effects on rail RCF suppressed by wear
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9723-2881
AB DEsolver, Östersund.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Number of Authors: 4
2017 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 380-381, 106-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) and wear, two major deterioration processes, limit the lifetime of rails. These deterioration processes are even more severe on the curves of tracks used by heavy haul trains. Because wear is a material removing process, it can suppress the formation of RCF (also known as surface initiated cracks). In railways, cracks have a higher risk of instigating a catastrophic failure than wear; hence, it is comparatively better to have wear than to have cracks. By controlling the top-of-rail friction, both of these deteriorating processes can be reduced to enhance the lifetime of rails. In order to achieve these possible advantages, the infrastructure manager of the Swedish railway is planning to implement a top-of-rail friction control technology on the iron ore line in northern Sweden wherein RCF is a major problem on the curves. The present study uses a damage index model in a multi-body simulation software and predicts the probability of RCF formation with suppressing effect of wear for different friction control values. The effect of friction control is simulated on curve radii ranging from 200 to 3,000 m and axle loads ranging from 30 to 40 t at a constant train speed of 60 km/h. Findings show that on a very sharp circular curve, radius < 300 m, RCF can be eliminated without friction control due to the high wear rate. On moderate curves, 300 < radius < 1,000 m, a friction coefficient (µ) of, at most, 0.3 with a Kalker's coefficient of, at most, 30% is required to avoid RCF

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 380-381, 106-114 p.
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Operation and Maintenance
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62498DOI: 10.1016/j.wear.2017.03.010ISI: 000401076300013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85015674892OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62498DiVA: diva2:1081614
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-27 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Khan, Saad AhmedLundberg, JanStenström, Christer

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