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Correlation between sound insulation and occupants’ perception: Proposal of alternative single number rating of impact sound, part II
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Simmons akustik och utveckling.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
Number of Authors: 3
2017 (English)In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682x, Vol. 123, 143-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A previous Swedish research project indicated the potential need for evaluating impact sound insulation from 20 Hz in buildings with lightweight constructions. This is a discrepancy compared to the commonly used frequency intervals starting from 50 or 100 Hz. The statistical significance of this groundbreaking suggestion was however not satisfactorily strong since the result was based upon a limited number of building objects.

The scope of the present paper is to secure the previous study by adding additional objects to the underlying database, thereby increasing the confidence of the results. The methodology is to perform impact sound insulation measurements in apartment buildings of various construction types and to perform questionnaire surveys among the residents. The measured sound insulation is compared to the subjective rating by the occupants in order to find the parameter giving the highest correlation with respect to frequency range and weighting.

The highest correlation was found when the impact sound insulation was evaluated from 25 Hz using a flat frequency-weighting factor. Frequencies below 50 Hz are of great importance when evaluating impact sound insulation in lightweight constructions

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 123, 143-151 p.
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62615DOI: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2017.03.014ISI: 000399510600014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85015798378OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62615DiVA: diva2:1083845
Note

Validerad; 2017; Nivå 2; 2017-03-22 (andbra)

Available from: 2017-03-22 Created: 2017-03-22 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Measurement and perception of sound insulation from 20 Hz between dwellings
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement and perception of sound insulation from 20 Hz between dwellings
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Population growth and urbanization are projected by the United Nations to add 2,5 billionpeople to the world’s urban population by 2050. We need to construct buildings in anunprecedented scale to meet global housing demand. Sustainable development is critical.Compared to traditional heavy constructions, lightweight wooden constructions are moreenvironmentally friendly and will play a key role in meeting future demands. However, thereare two major problems with lightweight constructions that need to be addressed: 1) Limitedlow frequency sound insulation and 2) Variations in sound insulation.Annoyance from walking sound tend to be higher in lightweight than in heavy constructionseven with the same measured sound insulation. The Swedish research program AkuLiteindicated that the correlation between measured sound insulation and annoyance wassignificantly improved by extending current evaluation methods from 50 Hz down to 20 Hz.Secondly, large variations in sound insulation between nominally identical lightweightconstructions are common, which leads to larger safety margins. By identifying and quantifyingunderlying causes, production costs can be minimized and the performance can be improved.The aim of the thesis is to develop a new evaluation method for impact sound insulation thatbetter correspond to rated annoyance, and to identify and control underlying causes forvariations in sound insulation. The thesis contains six papers.In Paper I and II, sound insulation measurements were carried out in a large number ofnominally identical rooms of two different industrially prefabricated lightweight woodenconstructions. The purpose was to assess and quantify the variations in impact and airbornesound insulation. In Paper I, 30 nominally identical apartments of a volume based system wasevaluated. The apartments on the highest floor achieved significantly better sound insulationdue to the extra weight on lower floors affecting the elastic connections between stories. InPaper II, 18 rooms of a cross-laminated timber system of plate elements were evaluated.Additionally, several potential parameters related to measurement uncertainty wereinvestigated.Paper III deals with measurement uncertainty. An empirical study of reverberation timemeasurements showed that current methods need to be improved, if sound insulationrequirements are to be extended to 20 Hz.Paper IV and V verified that the frequency range 20-50 Hz is important for walking soundannoyance, and that alternative frequency adaptation terms can improve the correlation betweenmeasured impact sound insulation and annoyance ratings. In Paper IV, the methodology was toperform extensive field measurements in apartment buildings of various construction types andto perform questionnaire surveys among the residents. In Paper V, the methodology was toevaluate annoyance based on binaural recordings of walking sound in a two-part listening test.In Paper VI, 70 measurements in a lightweight wooden system were evaluated to quantify thetotal variations in impact and airborne sound insulation from 20 and 50 Hz, respectively. It wasconcluded that the proposed metrics of impact sound insulation were primarily determined bythe impact sound level 20-40 Hz and that the measurement methods must be evaluatedthoroughly to avoid excessive safety margins.

A new evaluation method for impact sound insulation from 25 Hz, that correspond to the ratedannoyance for both heavy and lightweight constructions is proposed. By using the proposedmethod and attending the specific causes for variations, the lightweight industry will be able todevelop improved multi-story dwellings with higher perceived acoustic quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2017
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
Keyword
Sound insulation, Lightweight constructions, Annoyance, Measurement uncertainty, Low frequency, Building Acoustics, Walking noise
National Category
Other Civil Engineering
Research subject
Engineering Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62843 (URN)978-91-7583-868-7 (ISBN)978-91-7583-869-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-05-30, F531, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, 971 87 Luleå, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Note

Forskningsfinansiärer:

Sven Tyréns Stiftelse

Formas

Available from: 2017-04-05 Created: 2017-04-03 Last updated: 2017-06-14Bibliographically approved

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