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How to manage plant biomass originated from phytotechnologies?: Gathering perceptions from end-users
INERIS, Clean and Sustainable Technologies and Processes Unit, DRC/RISK, Parc Technologique Alata.
Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Wood and Plant Chemistry.
NERIS, Clean and Sustainable Technologies and Processes Unit, DRC/RISK, Parc Technologique Alata.
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Energy Department.
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2017 (English)In: International journal of phytoremediation, ISSN 1522-6514, E-ISSN 1549-7879Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

A questionnaire survey was carried out in 4 European countries to gather end-user's perceptions of using plants from phytotechnologies in combustion and anaerobic digestion (AD). 9 actors of the wood energy sector from France, Germany and Sweden, and 11 AD platform operators from France, Germany and Austria were interviewed. Questions related to installation, input materials, performed analyses, phytostabilization and phytoextraction. Although the majority of respondents did not know phytotechnologies, results suggested that plant biomass from phytomanaged areas could be used in AD and combustion, under certain conditions. As a potential advantage, these plants would not compete with plants grown on agricultural lands, contaminated lands being not suitable for agriculture production. Main limitations would be related to additional controls in process' inputs and end-products and installations that might generate additional costs. In most cases, price of phytotechnologies biomass was mentioned as a driver to potentially use plants from metal-contaminated soils. Plants used in phytostabilisation or phytoexclusion were thought to be less risky and, consequently, benefited from a better theoretical acceptance than those issued from phytoextraction. Results were discussed according to national regulations. One issue related to the regulatory gap concerning the status of the plant biomass produced on contaminated land.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017.
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Waste Science and Technology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-62697DOI: 10.1080/15226514.2017.1303814PubMedID: 28323452OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-62697DiVA: diva2:1084754
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2017-08-16

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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